Explain how half life is used in radioactive dating

The count rate is measured by using an instrument called a Geiger-Muller tube over a period of time.

A Geiger-Muller tube detects radiations by absorbing the radiation and converting it into an electrical pulse which triggers a counter and is displayed as a count rate. ] Radioactive elements have a wide range of half life values.

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. 1979, 1986 © Harper Collins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012 Cite This Source (hāf'līf') The average time needed for half the nuclei in a sample of a radioactive substance to undergo radioactive decay.

The half-life of a substance does not equal half of its full duration of radioactivity.

The release of radiation by unstable nuclei is called radioactive decay.

Today it is being replaced by electron beam radiation therapy systems.Comparing that to the half-life of the nuclei tells when they started to decay and, therefore, how old the object is. The method was developed by Willard Libby in the late 1940s and soon became a standard tool for archaeologists.The idea behind radiocarbon dating is straightforward, but years of work were required to develop the technique to the point where accurate dates could be obtained.Research has been ongoing since the 1960s to determine what the proportion of in the atmosphere has been over the past fifty thousand years.Libby received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in 1960.

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